More on how social media hacks brains to addict users

In a followup to How programmers addict you to social media, games and your mobile phone Ex-Facebook president Sean Parker: site made to exploit human ‘vulnerability’ He explained that when Facebook was being developed the objective was: “How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?” It was this mindset Read more about More on how social media hacks brains to addict users[…]

Could electrically stimulating criminals’ brains prevent crime?

A new study by a team of international researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Nanyang Technological University suggests that electrically stimulating the prefrontal cortex can reduce the desire to carry out violent antisocial acts by over 50 percent. The research, while undeniably compelling, raises a whole host of confronting ethical questions, not just over Read more about Could electrically stimulating criminals’ brains prevent crime?[…]

How programmers addict you to social media, games and your mobile phone

If you look at the current climate, the largest companies are the ones that hook you into their channel, whether it is a game, a website, shopping or social media. Quite a lot of research has been done in to how much time we spend watching TV and looking at our mobiles, showing differing numbers, Read more about How programmers addict you to social media, games and your mobile phone[…]

Stanford brainiacs say they can predict Reddit raids

A study [PDF] based on observations from 36,000 subreddit communities has found that online dust-ups can be predicted, and the people most likely to cause them can be identified. “Our analysis revealed a number of important trends related to conflict on Reddit, with general implications for intercommunity conflict on the web.” Among the takeaways were Read more about Stanford brainiacs say they can predict Reddit raids[…]

If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? Turns out it’s just chance.

The most successful people are not the most talented, just the luckiest, a new computer model of wealth creation confirms. Taking that into account can maximize return on many kinds of investment. […] The distribution of wealth follows a well-known pattern sometimes called an 80:20 rule: 80 percent of the wealth is owned by 20 Read more about If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? Turns out it’s just chance.[…]

Why hiring the ‘best’ people produces the least creative results

Yet the fallacy of meritocracy persists. Corporations, non-profits, governments, universities and even preschools test, score and hire the ‘best’. This all but guarantees not creating the best team. Ranking people by common criteria produces homogeneity. And when biases creep in, it results in people who look like those making the decisions. That’s not likely to Read more about Why hiring the ‘best’ people produces the least creative results[…]

Cheddar Man: Britains’ first men were black. And so were Europes’.

New research into ancient DNA extracted from the skeleton has helped scientists to build a portrait of Cheddar Man and his life in Mesolithic Britain.The biggest surprise, perhaps, is that some of the earliest modern human inhabitants of Britain may not have looked the way you might expect.Dr Tom Booth is a postdoctoral researcher working Read more about Cheddar Man: Britains’ first men were black. And so were Europes’.[…]

Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders

Intelligence makes for better leaders—from undergraduates to executives to presidents—according to multiple studies. It certainly makes sense that handling a market shift or legislative logjam requires cognitive oomph. But new research on leadership suggests that, at a certain point, having a higher IQ stops helping and starts hurting. […] The researchers looked at 379 male Read more about Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders[…]

Computer program that tries to determine if you reoffend is racist, wrong and been in use since 2000.

One widely used criminal risk assessment tool, Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS; Northpointe, which rebranded itself to “equivant” in January 2017), has been used to assess more than 1 million offenders since it was developed in 1998. The recidivism prediction component of COMPAS—the recidivism risk scale—has been in use since 2000. This Read more about Computer program that tries to determine if you reoffend is racist, wrong and been in use since 2000.[…]

Older Adults’ Forgetfulness Tied To non syncing Brain Rhythms In Sleep

During deep sleep, older people have less coordination between two brain waves that are important to saving new memories, a team reports in the journal Neuron. To find out, Walker and a team of scientists had 20 young adults learn 120 pairs of words. “Then we put electrodes on their head and we had them Read more about Older Adults’ Forgetfulness Tied To non syncing Brain Rhythms In Sleep[…]

Empirical evidence on how to interrogate: build rapport, not conflict

The Alisons, husband and wife, have done something no scholars of interrogation have been able to do before. Working in close cooperation with the police, who allowed them access to more than 1,000 hours of tapes, they have observed and analysed hundreds of real-world interviews with terrorists suspected of serious crimes. No researcher in the Read more about Empirical evidence on how to interrogate: build rapport, not conflict[…]

Cross-Cultural Study on Recognition of Emoticon’s shows that different cultures see emojis differently

Emoticons are getting more popular as the new communication channel to express feelings in online communication. Although familiarity to emoticons depends on cultures, how exposure matters in emotion recognition from emoticon is still open. To address this issue, we conducted a cross-cultural experimental study among Cameroon and Tanzania (hunter-gatherers, swidden farmers, pastoralists, and city dwellers) Read more about Cross-Cultural Study on Recognition of Emoticon’s shows that different cultures see emojis differently[…]

alcohol hangover–a puzzling phenomenon

The alcohol hangover develops when blood alcohol concentration (BAC) returns to zero and is characterized by a feeling of general misery that may last more than 24 h. It comprises a variety of symptoms including drowsiness, concentration problems, dry mouth, dizziness, gastro-intestinal complaints, sweating, nausea, hyper-excitability, and anxiety. The alcohol hangover is an intriguing issue Read more about alcohol hangover–a puzzling phenomenon[…]

A Literal Tree Illustration Shows How Languages Are Connected

Did you know that most of the different languages we speak today can actually be placed in only a couple of groups by their origin? This is what illustrator Minna Sundberg has captured in an elegant infographic of a linguistic tree which reveals some fascinating links between different tongues. Source: This Amazing Tree That Shows Read more about A Literal Tree Illustration Shows How Languages Are Connected[…]

Flat UI Elements Attract Less Attention and Cause Uncertainty

In an eyetracking experiment comparing different clickability clues, weak and flat signifiers required more user effort than strong ones. […] We conducted a quantitative experiment using eyetracking equipment and a desktop computer. We recruited 71 general web-users to participate in the experiment. Each participant was presented with one version of the 9 sites and given Read more about Flat UI Elements Attract Less Attention and Cause Uncertainty[…]

The open source community is nasty and that’s just the docs

The 2017 Open Source Survey was hosted on GitHub, which “collected responses from 5,500 randomly sampled respondents sourced from over 3,800 open source repositories” and then added “over 500 responses from a non-random sample of communities that work on other platforms.” The questionnaire was also made available in Traditional Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, and Russian. Interestingly, Read more about The open source community is nasty and that’s just the docs[…]

New Vampire Battery Technology Draws Energy Directly From Human Body

According to a research paper published earlier this month, the supercapacitor is made up by a device called a “harvester” that operates by using the body’s heat and movements to extract electrical charges from ions found in human body fluids, such as blood, serum, or urine. As electrodes, the harvester uses a carbon nanomaterial called Read more about New Vampire Battery Technology Draws Energy Directly From Human Body[…]

Endurance in a pill

“It’s well known that people can improve their aerobic endurance through training,” says senior author Ronald Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and holder of Salk’s March of Dimes Chair in Molecular and Developmental Biology. “The question for us was: how does endurance work? And if we really understand the science, can we replace training Read more about Endurance in a pill[…]

Popular belief that saturated fat clogs up arteries is a myth, experts say – let the wars begin: others disagree!

Heart experts have been criticised for claiming it is “plain wrong” to believe that saturated fat clogs up arteries. Three specialists argued that eating “real food”, taking exercise and reducing stress are better ways to stave off heart disease than cutting out dietary saturated fat. Writing in a respected journal, they maintained that inflammation is Read more about Popular belief that saturated fat clogs up arteries is a myth, experts say – let the wars begin: others disagree![…]

Molecule kills elderly cells, reduces signs of aging in mice

Even if you aren’t elderly, your body is home to agents of senility—frail and damaged cells that age us and promote disease. Now, researchers have developed a molecule that selectively destroys these so-called senescent cells. The compound makes old mice act and appear more youthful, providing hope that it may do the same for us. Read more about Molecule kills elderly cells, reduces signs of aging in mice[…]

The Dunning-Kruger effect: why do incompetent people think they are so great? or Unskilled and unaware of it: How difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments.

People tend to hold overly favorable views of their abilities in many social and intellectual domains. The authors suggest that this overestimation occurs, in part, because people who are unskilled in these domains suffer a dual burden: Not only do these people reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of Read more about The Dunning-Kruger effect: why do incompetent people think they are so great? or Unskilled and unaware of it: How difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments.[…]