That this AI can simulate universes in 30ms is not the scary part. It’s that its creators don’t know why it works so well

The accuracy of the neural network is judged by how similar its outputs were to the ones created by two more traditional N-body simulation systems, FastPM and 2LPT, when all three are given the same inputs. When D3M was tasked with producing 1,000 simulations from 1,000 sets of input data, it had a relative error of 2.8 per cent compared to FastPM, and a 9.3 per cent compared to 2LPT for the same inputs. That’s not too bad, considering it takes the model just 30 milliseconds to crank out a simulation. Not only does that save time, but it’s also cheaper too since less compute power is needed.

To their surprise, the researchers also noticed that D3M seemed to be able to produce simulations of the universe from conditions that weren’t specifically included in the training data. During inference tests, the team tweaked input variables such as the amount of dark matter in the virtual universes, and the model still managed to spit out accurate simulations despite not being specifically trained for these changes.

“It’s like teaching image recognition software with lots of pictures of cats and dogs, but then it’s able to recognize elephants,” said Shirley Ho, first author of the paper and a group leader at the Flatiron Institute. “Nobody knows how it does this, and it’s a great mystery to be solved.

“We can be an interesting playground for a machine learner to use to see why this model extrapolates so well, why it extrapolates to elephants instead of just recognizing cats and dogs. It’s a two-way street between science and deep learning.”

The source code for the neural networks can be found here.

Source: That this AI can simulate universes in 30ms is not the scary part. It’s that its creators don’t know why it works so well • The Register