Coditany of Timeness” is a convincing lo-fi black metal album, complete with atmospheric interludes, tremolo guitar, frantic blast beats and screeching vocals. But the record, which you can listen to on Bandcamp, wasn’t created by musicians.Instead, it was generated by two musical technologists using a deep learning software that ingests a musical album, processes it, and spits out an imitation of its style.To create Coditany, the software broke “Diotima,” a 2011 album by a New York black metal band called Krallice, into small segments of audio. Then they fed each segment through a neural network — a type of artificial intelligence modeled loosely on a biological brain — and asked it to guess what the waveform of the next individual sample of audio would be. If the guess was right, the network would strengthen the paths of the neural network that led to the correct answer, similar to the way electrical connections between neurons in our brain strengthen as we learn new skills.At first the network just produced washes of textured noise. “Early in its training, the kinds of sounds it produces are very noisy and grotesque and textural,” said CJ Carr, one of the creators of the algorithm. But as it moved through guesses — as many as five million over the course of three days — the network started to sound a lot like Krallice. “As it improves its training, you start hearing elements of the original music it was trained on come through more and more.”As someone who used to listen to lo-fi black metal, I found Coditany of Timeness not only convincing — it sounds like a real human band — but even potentially enjoyable. The neural network managed to capture the genre’s penchant for long intros broken by frantic drums and distorted vocals. The software’s take on Krallice, which its creators filled out with song titles and album art that were also algorithmically generated, might not garner a glowing review on Pitchfork, but it’s strikingly effective at capturing the aesthetic. If I didn’t know it was generated by an algorithm, I’m not sure I’d be able to tell the difference.

Source: This frostbitten black metal album was created by an artificial intelligence | The Outline