Army Hires Company To Develop Cyber Defenses For Its Strykers After They Were Hacked

On Nov. 16, 2020, Virginia-based cybersecurity firm Shift5, Inc. announced that it had received a $2.6 million contract from the Army’s Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office (RCCTO) to “provide unified cybersecurity prototype kits designed to help protect the operational technology of the Army’s Stryker combat vehicle platform.” The company says it first pitched its plan for these kits at RCCTO’s first-ever Innovation Day event in September 2019.

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“Adversaries demonstrated the ability to degrade select capabilities of the ICV-D when operating in a contested cyber environment,” according to an annual report from the Pentagon’s Office of the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation, or DOT&E, covering activities during the 2018 Fiscal Year. “In most cases, the exploited vulnerabilities pre-date the integration of the lethality upgrades.”

The “lethality upgrades” referred to here center on the integration of a turret armed with a 30mm automatic cannon onto the Infantry Carrier Vehicle (ICV) variant of the Stryker, resulting in the Dragoon version. The indication here is that the cyber vulnerabilities were present in systems also found on unmodified ICVs, suggesting that the issues are, or at least were, impacted other Stryker variants, as well.

Source: Army Hires Company To Develop Cyber Defenses For Its Strykers After They Were Hacked