LANtenna attack reveals Ethernet cable traffic contents from a distance

An Israeli researcher has demonstrated that LAN cables’ radio frequency emissions can be read by using a $30 off-the-shelf setup, potentially opening the door to fully developed cable-sniffing attacks.

Mordechai Guri of Israel’s Ben Gurion University of the Negev described the disarmingly simple technique to The Register, which consists of putting an ordinary radio antenna up to four metres from a category 6A Ethernet cable and using an off-the-shelf software defined radio (SDR) to listen around 250MHz.

“From an engineering perspective, these cables can be used as antennas and used for RF transmission to attack the air-gap,” said Guri.

His experimental technique consisted of slowing UDP packet transmissions over the target cable to a very low speed and then transmitting single letters of the alphabet. The cable’s radiations could then be picked up by the SDR (in Guri’s case, both an R820T2-based tuner and a HackRF unit) and, via a simple algorithm, be turned back into human-readable characters.

Nicknamed LANtenna, Guri’s technique is an academic proof of concept and not a fully fledged attack that could be deployed today. Nonetheless, the research shows that poorly shielded cables have the potential to leak information which sysadmins may have believed were secure or otherwise air-gapped from the outside world.

He added that his setup’s $1 antenna was a big limiting factor and that specialised antennas could well reach “tens of metres” of range.

“We could transmit both text and binary, and also achieve faster bit-rates,” acknowledged Guri when El Reg asked about the obvious limitations described in his paper [PDF]. “However, due to environmental noises (e.g. from other cables) higher bit-rate are rather theoretical and not practical in all scenarios.”

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Source: LANtenna attack reveals Ethernet cable traffic contents • The Register

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