The Eindhoven suspension is not only electromagnetic but also active, meaning that it doesn’t just mechanically respond to bumps in the road, but is controlled by an onboard computer. That computer receives input from accelerometers and other sensors on the vehicle, and adjusts the suspension accordingly within a fraction of a second. While active suspension is nothing new (at least, not for cars), it has previously mainly been integrated into hydraulic systems. According to the Eindhoven researchers, however, hydraulics can’t react as quickly as their electromagnetic system, and therefore can’t match the smoothness of its ride.

With a peak consumption of 500 watts, the suspension uses about a quarter of the power of hydraulic systems. It also stretches its battery life by using road vibrations to generate electricity. The designers believe that with refinements, the suspension’s energy-efficiency could be improved even further.

via Electromagnetic automobile suspension demonstrated.