Android bug lets hackers plant malware via NFC beaming

Google patched last month an Android bug that can let hackers spread malware to a nearby phone via a little-known Android OS feature called NFC beaming.

NFC beaming works via an internal Android OS service known as Android Beam. This service allows an Android device to send data such as images, files, videos, or even apps, to another nearby device using NFC (Near-Field Communication) radio waves, as an alternative to WiFi or Bluetooth.

Typically, apps (APK files) sent via NFC beaming are stored on disk and a notification is shown on screen. The notification asks the device owner if he wants to allow the NFC service to install an app from an unknown source.

But, in January this year, a security researcher named Y. Shafranovich discovered that apps sent via NFC beaming on Android 8 (Oreo) or later versions would not show this prompt. Instead, the notification would allow the user to install the app with one tap, without any security warning.

While the lack of one prompt sounds unimportant, this is a major issue in Android’s security model. Android devices aren’t allowed to install apps from “unknown sources” — as anything installed from outside the official Play Store is considered untrusted and unverified.

Source: Android bug lets hackers plant malware via NFC beaming | ZDNet