Leaky AWS S3 buckets are so common, they’re being found by the thousands now – with lots of buried secrets

Misconfigured AWS S3 storage buckets exposing massive amounts of data to the internet are like an unexploded bomb just waiting to go off, say experts.

The team at Truffle Security said its automated search tools were able to stumble across some 4,000 open Amazon-hosted S3 buckets that included data companies would not want public – things like login credentials, security keys, and API keys.

In fact, the leak hunters say that exposed data was so common, they were able to count an average of around 2.5 passwords and access tokens per file analyzed per repository. In some cases, more than 10 secrets were found in a single file; some files had none at all.

These credentials included SQL Server passwords, Coinbase API keys, MongoDB credentials, and logins for other AWS buckets that actually were configured to ask for a password.

That the Truffle Security team was able to turn up roughly 4,000 insecure buckets with private information shows just how common it is for companies to leave their cloud storage instances unguarded.

Though AWS has done what it can to get customers to lock down their cloud instances, finding exposed storage buckets and databases is pretty trivial for trained security professionals to pull off.

In some cases, the leak-hunters have even partnered up with law firms, collecting referral fees when they send aggrieved customers to take part in class-action lawsuits against companies that exposed their data.

Source: Leaky AWS S3 buckets are so common, they’re being found by the thousands now – with lots of buried secrets • The Register