In November 2016, the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) was alerted by a “partner organisation” that an attacker had gained access to the network of a 50-person aerospace engineering firm that subcontracts to the Department of Defence.

Restricted technical information on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft, the C-130 transport aircraft, the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) smart bomb kit, and “a few Australian naval vessels” was among the sensitive data stolen from a small Australian defence contractor in 2016.

The secret information was restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), the US system designed to control the export of defence- and military-related technologies, according to Mitchell Clarke, an incident response manager at the ASD who worked on the case
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The victim’s network was small. One person managed all IT-related functions, and they’d only been in the role for nine months. High staff turnover was typical.

There was no protective DMZ network, no regular patching regime, and a common Local Administrator account password on all servers. Hosts had many internet-facing services.

Access was initially gained by exploiting a 12-month-old vulnerability in the company’s IT Helpdesk Portal, which was mounting the company’s file server using the Domain Administrator account. Lateral movement using those same credentials eventually gave the attacker access to the domain controller and the remote desktop server, and to email and other sensitive information.

“This isn’t uncommon,” Clarke said. “Only about 12 months old, if you look at government, that’s not that out of date, unfortunately.”

The attacker needn’t have bothered with that, however. The ASD’s investigation found that internet-facing services still had their default passwords, admin::admin and guest::guest.

An important aspect of this incident is that a small company, with resources that were clearly inadequate given the sensitivity of the data they held, still managed to obtain and hold ITAR certification.

According to Clarke, an application for ITAR certification is usually only “two or three pages”, and asks only basic questions about organisations’ security posture.

Source: Secret F-35, P-8, C-130 data stolen in Australian defence contractor hack | ZDNet