Perhaps you’ve been hearing strange sounds in your home—ghostly creaks and moans, random Rick Astley tunes, Alexa commands issued in someone else’s voice. If so, you haven’t necessarily lost your mind. Instead, if you own one of a few models of internet-connected speaker and you’ve been careless with your network settings, you might be one of thousands of people whose Sonos or Bose devices have been left wide open to audio hijacking by hackers around the world.Researchers at Trend Micro have found that some models of Sonos and Bose speakers—including the Sonos Play:1, the newer Sonos One, and Bose SoundTouch systems—can be pinpointed online with simple internet scans, accessed remotely, and then commandeered with straightforward tricks to play any audio file that a hacker chooses. Only a small fraction of the total number of Bose and Sonos speakers were found to be accessible in their scans. But the researchers warn that anyone with a compromised device on their home network, or who has opened up their network to provide direct access to a server they’re running to the external internet—say, to host a game server or share files—has potentially left their fancy speakers vulnerable to an epic aural prank.

Source: Hackers Can Rickroll Thousands of Sonos and Bose Speakers Over the Internet | WIRED